Read : Brownbaby

M i x i n g I s G o o d

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MADNESS BREAKDOWN:

For the cost of sending 2 young men to jail for 4 years for setting up a facebook group that didn’t cause a riot, you could employ 4 youth workers for 4 years working with up to 200 of the most alienated young people per year (800 young people in 4 yrs).

OR pay for a full time youth advice service in 8 large secondary schools (benefitting around 10,000 young people) for a year.

OR you could employ 24 young people on £15,000 for a year, at a time when youth unemployment in the UK has reached over 20%.

Filed under uk riots politics youth london

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A report by the IPCC reveals the disturbing number of black people who die in police custody. The 105 page report titled, ‘Deaths in or following police custody: An examination of the cases 1998/99 – 2008/09 reveals an alarming trend of black deaths in police custody.

A report by the IPCC reveals the disturbing number of black people who die in police custody. The 105 page report titled, ‘Deaths in or following police custody: An examination of the cases 1998/99 – 2008/09 reveals an alarming trend of black deaths in police custody.  It was found that 68% of people who died in police custody were arrested for non violent offences. There was a breach of police procedure in 27% of cases and that people from black and minority ethnic backgrounds were more likely to be restrained whilst in police custody than whites.

Filed under race police racism uk politics riots london

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I got nothing.: Working Poor

cocothinkshefancy:

I am not a huge fan of this descriptive, but I get it. And since I fall smack dab into this demographic, I spend far too much time thinking about what it means.

Never mind that I was unemployed for almost 8 months so we’re already living in a massive deficit, but I have a lot of work and life experience, but in fields that do not pay a lot. I have a family, which means I have a level of responsibility with regards to housing and food, so I have to make ends meet.

We don’t. At this point, I am the head of the household based on the IRS tax rolls. I work in a serious and very difficult job and am responsible for things in an organization that rank as pretty high, but am paid not a lot, which in my field, a start-up arts and education non-profit, it’s totally expected. That alone astounds me, as we’re doing really good things here. Helping children in high-risk situations, providing our state with a monument and connection to historic bravery and yet we have to sing for our dinners. It sucks. It makes me feel really depressed to think it takes far more work to do good things. 

When I went in and set up our Medicare, I was really taken aback to some of the questions they asked and the paperwork I was required to provide. Anyone who thinks some ne-er-do-well can just show up and get a ‘free handout’ is clearly a fucking table, because I had to tell at least 4 people I was not pregnant and answer a litany of question regarding my drug use, where I get my income, etc…

It’s mind-blogging to me that as a society, we’ve become so far removed from understanding how each other lives. I don’t actually want to be rich. In fact, I don’t want the responsibilities that come with it. I’d like to have enough money to pay my utlility bills and feed my daughter. I don’t think that’s a lot to ask. Yet, society seems to spit back at me that what I want is either not achievable or selfish.

It’s certainly easy to mock people who bought too-big houses and too many cars and ran up $50k in credit card debt on clothes from Talbots, but the reality is we’re all responsible for that, too. We’ve made our society so based on having stuff we’ve forgotten about DOING stuff as opposed to having it.

I’ve lost my way in this, so you’ll have to bear with me. I think what I originally wanted to write about has kindof left, but maybe what I’m wondering is why we no longer actually care about each other anymore. It’s so divided; me vs you and fuck you if you even remotely infringe on my side.

As a society, we’re so afraid, so angry and unable to empathize with one another. Frankly, it feels so un-Christian. I am not a Christian because I don’t believe there is ANY god, but I was raised a Catholic and have spent so many hours (that I will NEVER get back, derp) reading and listening to the dogma. Last I checked, some of the basic tenets are we’re supposed to WANT to help each other, which by in large helps the entire world, not push each other away. 

So how did this happen? 

(Source: ro-s-a-spark-s)

Filed under Working poor random thought society money arts

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Britain's fried-chicken booooooooom

The “Worldwide Evils of Black Culture?”: This is food as a basic necessity. They are coming because they’re hungry.

"Fried chicken won’t work in Chelsea, Kensington or Hampstead, or anywhere like that. It’s only places for the lower middle class or working class. That’s the only place you can do it."

No surprise that it is in the most deprived areas that fast-food outlets, and fried chicken places in particular, seem to thrive. Since 1998, the average income of the poorest households has risen by 17.5%. In the same time, food prices rose by 25%.

In the borough of Tower Hamlets, home of the capital’s most deprived children, for every school there are 42 fast-food outlets. In inner-city London generally, the figure is 37. In the country at large, on average just 25.

Filed under business chicken environment food health society uk urban urban living london

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Before and after: Lower Shankill murals redesigns
In Northern Ireland, Belfast city council’s Re-imaging Communities programme replaces old murals with new ones, charting the social, cultural and industrial heritage of the Lower Shankill area

Before and after: Lower Shankill murals redesigns

In Northern Ireland, Belfast city council’s Re-imaging Communities programme replaces old murals with new ones, charting the social, cultural and industrial heritage of the Lower Shankill area

Filed under art community murals politics uk ulster arts

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It was interesting to note how discombobulated the right was, at least at first. The days of the riots and subsequently witnessed the commentocracy both in the press and online trying to fix on an agreed narrative.

At first, they reached for their automatic response of immigration. But that did not work so well, and they were clearly unsettled by the sight of Turkish and other Muslim communities taking to the streets to defend law and order. That didn’t “fit” right.

Then they moved onto the race card, but that began to fall apart when tv pictures picked out white faces with increasing frequency.

They now seem to have settled on the welfare state. The idea of double punishment - whereby an offender who lives in social housing faces both penal sanction plus eviction whereas an offender who lives in a private residence faces only the former - is catching fire (no pun intended) among conservatives. You can see the appeal of this thinking: the welfare state becomes the means of apportioning blame, becomes tied up in the public mind with guilt and criminality, and provides a method of extra-judicial vindictiveness.

The language of social service “parasites” also has one great appeal to the right: it sounds the dog whistle on immigration and ethnic minorities without having to prove, or even state in plain words, anything. The equation is basically simple. A white criminal loots a shop = he is a product of a criminal class of welfare state scroungers = the idea of welfare state scroungers at some level in Daily Mail land equates to black people, immigrants and Muslims.

All rhetorical and narrative difficulties resolved. Order restored to the universe.

RedSperanza